Skip to main content

About your Search

20121201
20121231
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
. our "making a difference report" from nbc's ron mott. >> reporter: turning fun into future success is where he spent his time, pushing the sport these youngsters hardly know. he started inner city lacrosse, a nonprofit for kids just like eleven-year-old colby spence. he is already hooked >> i couldn't believe it, they wanted us to join. >> a lot of people can't afford to participate in these activities, and sometimes you find yourself even in that situation. >> reporter: lacrosse, a lot of people think it is an elite sport. >> i think it is, but let's change that. >> reporter: growing up in the shadows of an ivy league tower like the one in new haven, yale university, in connecticut, fuelled a burning desire to overcome >> i grew up in the section where they told the yale students not to go. >> reporter: a single mom, youngest of six, he jumped at the chance to get ahead. >> when i walked on the campus, as a little boy, going for enrichment classes, i felt so important, and smart. and so i wanted to introduce that element. >> reporter: so he convinced the equipment-makers to give h
to get the party started in times square. and that is where we find nbc's ron mott, along with hundreds of thousands of his closest friends tonight. ron, good evening. >> reporter: hey there, kate, good evening to you. times square, of course, is electric every day of the week. but on december 31st, it is absolutely super charged. an estimated 1 million people are expected to jam into the streets here, ready to toast a new year. another year, another ball, another chance to dance to a different tune. as crowds clog the heart of manhattan for its annual raucous party, goodbye '12, hello '13. >> going to be a year of a adventure so starting it off right. >> new year, want to have new goals. >> reporter: celebrations have been going on around the globe. from new zealand and australia to tokyo and beijing. ♪ >> reporter: across america, 12:00 will arrive to crowds hungry for a fresh start. there's a moon pie over mobile. they squeeze an orange in miami. it's peachy in atlanta. back here in new york, bulbs are in, the crystal sparkles, especially one honoring the late dick clark, the first
with britain's other leading lady were famously warm. prime minister thatcher called the president "ron" he addressed her as "margaret." together, they were political soul mates. >> i think they had a quite congenial, personal connection to each other. although what these documents show is that margaret thatcher wasn't always so full of praise for reagan. >> reporter: britain was at war with argentina, trying to hold on to its islands in the south atlantic. >> the united states came down firmly on our side, and we're very grateful we have been such strong allies. >> reporter: but in private, there was tension. reagan urged her to negotiate, but she wanted victory. mrs. thatcher said she was sure that the president would act in the same way if alaska had been threatened. to get what she wanted, the iron lady used her softer side. >> dear ron, she writes. i think you are the only person who will understand the significance of what i'm trying to say. >> very personal. >> absolutely. >> reporter: mrs. thatcher's charm offensive did the trick and they remained friends long after they left power.
. police said today the convicted killer who drew them into his deadly trap left a note. here's nbc's ron mott. >> reporter: police say the christmas eve ambush of four firefighters battling a massive house fire in new york was spelled out by the suspected arsonist and shooter in chilling, typewritten detail. >> quote, i still have to get ready to see how much of the neighborhood i can burn down and do i like doing best, killing people. >> reporter: authority ts say 62 years william spengler, who served prison time for killing his grandmother more than 30 years ago, shot at first responders who arrived at his burning house, the fire spreading to six other homes. >> we are being shot at. multiple firemen down. i am shot. i think he's using an assault rifle. >> he was equipped to go to war to kill innocent people. >> reporter: the gunman was well-fortified with weapons and ammo. the same model used in the newtown, connecticut, school shooting. tomasz kaczowka and mike chiapperini were killed. spengler killed himself. and late today, human remains were found in spengler's house and suspect t
that declared slaves in this country forever free. the document is once again on display. and nbc's ron mott has more. >> reporter: though clearly showing its age, fading ink, a yellow patina, the emancipation proclamation still draws undivided attention 150 years later, a document whose aim was to unite a country divided by war. >> it's amazing to see abraham lincoln's signature. >> reporter: today at the national archives in washington you can the frail order consigned to history on january 1, 1863, by president abraham linkson again on public display. showtime, just a few days every year. >> very uplifting experience. it is a very important document. >> reporter: presidential historian doris kerns good win on president lincoln freeing the slaves in the rebel states to fight for their own freedom. >> philosophically i lincoln had always believed that slavery was wrong. there's no question about that, from the time he was a young man. the question was what power did he, once he became president, have to do something about ending slavery? he finally found that door with his powers as commander i
report from nbc's ron mott in boston. >> i have just called president obama to congratulate him on his victory. >> reporter: as mitt romney, members of his campaign staff and top gop leaders continue assessing how he lost the election to a vulnerable incumbent president, the oldest son of the former massachusetts governor is raises eyebrows about his dad's initial reluctance to make a second white house run. in a story published in sunday's "boston globe," tag romney says his father "wanted to be president less than anyone i've met in my life. he had no desire to run. if could have found someone else to take his place, we have been ecstatic to step aside" "boston globe" reporter michael krenish interviewed tag romney. >> i know there were serious discussion and concerns at the time before he decided to run and lacked at the field of competition and saw it was pretty weak. his family pushed him to say he would be the best person, gimp the wait field has taken shape. >> reporter: nbc's garrett haake spent a year cover the campaign. >> in between campaign romney was stunned by the loss bu
myilacly ol ma ly noama.ron d i coy. 15arhen min marewi evers a ar, lecoom wee.con t e ck ac s fo s
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (31 Dec 2014)